Tag Archives: climate change

Stop Haze & Climate Change in 30 mins: a series of talks at Library Outpost @ The Hive

September 2016 has been a relatively haze free but will we continue to enjoy non-polluted air in October?

Join us at the Library Outpost (Level 1) @ The Hive in October to find out some of the steps we can take to fight the haze and climate change.

  1. Stop haze by Zhang Wen, Executive Director from People’s Movement to Stop Haze (PM.Haze). Wed Oct 5th, 2016. 12.30pm – 1pm. Register
  2. Environmental events and activities in Singapore by Lastrina, co-founder of Singapore Youth for Climate Action. Wed Oct 12th, 2016. 12.30pm – 1pm.  Register
  3. What is climate action and why does it matter to you? by Cuifen co-founder of Singapore Youth for Climate Action. Wed Oct 19th, 2016. 12.30pm – 1pm. Register
  4. 350 Climate change movement in Singapore by Gracie Low from 350 Singapore.  Wed Oct 26th 2016. 12.30pm – 1pm.  Register

 

Global Droughts 2016

GPCC based 1-month SPI, May 5, 2016. From the Global Drought Information System.

GPCC based 1-month SPI, May 5, 2016. From the Global Drought Information System.

In Peter Gleick’s April 27, 2016 ScienceBlogs post, Global Droughts: A Bad Year, he highlighted that the El Nino effects are particularly severe this year and can contribute to more widespread droughts. Furthermore, the El Nino has an impact on precipitation variability on land. Gleick reported that during the 1st four months of 2016 “water shortages are afflicting a large number of people”.

Areas currently facing drought include India, Southeast Asia (especially the Mekong Basin), The Carribbean, South America, Southern Africa, Somalia, the Eastern Mediterranean, and California.

Permafrost and its impact on ecosystems

Permafrost

Methane gas bubbles are trapped in the ice. Photo Credit: Miriam Jones, USGS.Taken from USGS Blog Science Feature http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/permafrost-its-chill/

Methane gas bubbles are trapped in the ice. Photo Credit: Miriam Jones, USGS.Taken from USGS Blog Science Feature http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/permafrost-its-chill/

Permafrost refers to soil that has remained below zero degree C for more 2 years. A science feature updated by Ethan Alpern on the USGS blog mentions that periods of warming in the Arctic systems causes permafrost to thaw. This causes microbial activity releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane into atmosphere. The greenhouse effect caused by these gases impacts global warming in turn causing more permafrost thawing. Find out more on permafrost from NTU Libraries E-books:

 

Free Online Course on Climate Change

If you would like to understand the science behind climate change, David Archer the author of the book ‘Global Warming – Understanding the forecast’ has put together an online course based on the book and it is free for all.

The course starts on October 21st 2013 and you can sign up at https://www.coursera.org/course/globalwarming. For more info check this post on Real Climate.

 – taken from article posted by Dan Satterfield, AGU Blogosphere 

Rising sea levels could lead to the world’s first climate-change refugees from island nations in the pacific

earth-sadface

At the Pacific Islands Forum held in early September 2013, at the Marshall Islands, the president of the island warned that climate change has already arrived.

Some of these islands are only about two metres above sea level making them especially vulnerable to the risk of being covered by the rising sea water. Earlier this year, the islands also faced simultaneous floods and droughts. For people living in small nations like Kiribati, Tuvalu and the Marshall Islands the rising tide is an immediate threat to their homes. As mentioned in the ‘The Economist’ heavy floods in the Carteret islands, Papua New Guinea have led to fears that the people may be asked to evacuate making them climate-change refugees.

The Majuro Declaration for Climate Leadership will be proposed at the summit in order to garner political commitment.  Read more..

National Sea Simulator

The Australian Institute of Marine Science (AIMS) launched a $37 million world class marine research aquarium on 1st August 2013 called the National Sea Simulator. This will allow researchers to simulate the ocean and conduct experiments by manipulating different environmental factors like light, temperature, contaminants, salinity etc. to study its impact on the tropical marine ecosystems. SeaSim is an international facility that allows researchers from around the world to apply to use it. Watch a video from the Australian Institute of Marine Science explain what the Sea Simulator can do

You can find more information on climate change and its impact on marine ecosystems by reading the E-books below:

1. Coral reefs and climate change: science and management
2. Climate Change and Island and Coastal Vulnerability
3. Climate change: observed impacts on planet Earth
4. Quaternary coral reef systems: history, development processes and controlling factors