Tag Archives: Earth Science

Open access journals in the Geosciences: SCRAAP before you publish in one

openaccessAre you looking to publish in an open access journal in the Geosciences? GSIS members have published a  list of “Open Access Journals in the Geosciences”  which has been fully updated with 2015 publication charges (article processing fees) and current impact factors. Selected physics, materials science, biology, and chemistry journals are also included.

Here at NTU libraries, science librarians have been teaching undergraduates the use of CRAAP – criteria for evaluating sources. CRAAP is an acronym for Currency, Reliability, Authority, Accuracy, and Purpose. Before considering whether to publish in an open access journal, consider doing the Scholar’s CRAAP (SCRAAP) Test to help you evaluate the call for papers and publisher’s web site.

NTU researchers’ can also promote open access by depositing your accepted (author-created version incorporating referee comments and is accepted for publication) version of the paper into your institutional repository. Here is a detailed guide on how you can do so.

Reference:
1. Shaun Hardy, D. G. L. L., Carnegie Institution for Science, et al. (2015 April). “Open Access Journals in the Geosciences.” Retrieved 20th April 2015, from http://www.geoinfo.org/geooajour.html.
2. “Evaluating Calls for Papers:The SCRAAP Test – A CRAAP Test for Scholars.” from http://wiu.libguides.com/SCRAAP.

Chances of 8.0 earthquake in California in next three decades increases

According to scientists from U.S. Geological Survey the chances have jumped from 4.75 to 7% of a major earthquake in California in the next three decades. The reason for this is scientists now understand that earthquakes are not limited to separate faults and they could start with one fault and jump to others. Read more from the article in L.A. Times on March 10, 2015 by Rong-Gong Lin II & Rosanna Xia.
The new forecast from U.S.G.S. was released as part of the publication The Third California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF3)

Interested in learning more. Here are some books and resources to help you:
1. The million death quake : the science of predicting Earth’s deadliest natural disaster
2. The big shake : implications of a major earthquake in California
3. The great San Francisco earthquake [videorecording]
4. Tectonic geomorphology

Earth’s tectonic plates: A new explanation

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The San Andreas fault in California marks the meeting of the Pacific and North American tectonic plates. | Design Pics / Jack Goldfarb via Getty Images

Tectonic plates are massive slabs of solid rock that have an irregular shape and float on the Earth’s mantle. According to researchers in an article reported in Nature the earth’s tectonic plates may have taken 1 billion years to form.  The cooler part’s of the Earth’s crust were pulled downwards into the warmer upper mantle and this process repeated until the weak areas formed plate boundaries. This has however not occurred on Venus, where similar subduction occurs but has not produced tectonic plates. The authors of the article developed a computer model of Earth’s crust to simulate conditions of the Earth’s crust as it might have existed billions of years ago.. Read the original article in Nature by David Bercovici and Yanick Ricard

Reference for this post taken from article in Huffington Post dated 04/07/2014 by Jessica Morrison

Permafrost and its impact on ecosystems

Permafrost

Methane gas bubbles are trapped in the ice. Photo Credit: Miriam Jones, USGS.Taken from USGS Blog Science Feature http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/permafrost-its-chill/

Methane gas bubbles are trapped in the ice. Photo Credit: Miriam Jones, USGS.Taken from USGS Blog Science Feature http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/permafrost-its-chill/

Permafrost refers to soil that has remained below zero degree C for more 2 years. A science feature updated by Ethan Alpern on the USGS blog mentions that periods of warming in the Arctic systems causes permafrost to thaw. This causes microbial activity releasing large amounts of carbon dioxide and methane into atmosphere. The greenhouse effect caused by these gases impacts global warming in turn causing more permafrost thawing. Find out more on permafrost from NTU Libraries E-books:

 

Active Volcano beneath Antarctica!

 

It's not as peaceful as it looks under west Antarctica (Image: Michael Studinger/NASA) From the New Scientist http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn24589-seething-volcano-buried-under-antarcticas-ice.html#.Uo7acsv2OM9

It’s not as peaceful as it looks under west Antarctica (Image: Michael Studinger/NASA)
From the New Scientist http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn24589-seething-volcano-buried-under-antarcticas-ice.html#.Uo7acsv2OM9

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It has been known that volcanoes have existed beneath the glaciers in Antarctica but for the first time an active volcano was spotted beneath the ice sheet of west Antarctica as reported in New Scientist. A network of seismometers installed by in Marie Byrd Land in western Antarctica have detected 2 tremors; the nature of these tremors suggesting that they could be due to earthquakes beneath active volcanoes. To find out more, read the full article published in journal Nature GeoScience. [Please provide your network id/password for authentication when prompted.]

Free Online Course on Climate Change

If you would like to understand the science behind climate change, David Archer the author of the book ‘Global Warming – Understanding the forecast’ has put together an online course based on the book and it is free for all.

The course starts on October 21st 2013 and you can sign up at https://www.coursera.org/course/globalwarming. For more info check this post on Real Climate.

 – taken from article posted by Dan Satterfield, AGU Blogosphere 

Volcanic Ash

Mount Sinabung spews volcanic materials from its crater as seen from Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes after the volcano erupted Sunday. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)

Mount Sinabung spews volcanic materials from its crater as seen from Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. Thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes after the volcano erupted Sunday. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara)

Mount Sinabung spews volcanic materials from its crater as seen from Karo, North Sumatra, Indonesia, Monday, Sept. 16, 2013. (AP Photo/Binsar Bakkara) | AP

Mount Sinabung in western Indonesia, is among one of the 120 active volcanoes in Indonesia. It erupted on 24th October 2013, spewing not lava or debris but black ash. It has been dormant for three years with its last explosion in August 2010. Read more about this on the Huffington Post. To find more information on volcanic ash read:-

1. Volcanic Ash by Heiken, Grant

2. Learn from 2010 Eruptions at Merapi and Sinabung Volcanoes in Indonesia

3. Traversing nature’s danger zone: getting up close with Sumatra’s volcanoes

 

Earthquake magnitude

Credit: Nathan Becker, Pacific Tsunami Warning Center / OurAmazingPlanet.com

While we have all heard about earthquake magnitudes and the Richter scale. What does it actually mean and what is the difference between a magnitude 5.0 and 8.0 on the Richter scale. Watch this animation to understand..