Tag Archives: biological

New Title for Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Title: Biomarkers in drug development : a handbook of practice, application, and strategy
Editor: Michael R. Bleavins
Call number: R853.B54B615M
Availability: Click here

Summary:
Contributors from huge drug companies, small drug companies, and a few academic departments examine biomarkers and their role in drug development, technology approaches to identifying new biomarkers, characterization and validation, biomarkers in discovery and preclinical safety, translating from preclinical results to clinical and back, biomarkers in clinical trials, practical aspects of biomarker implementation, and where they are headed and what they need. The specific topics include enabling go/no-go decisions, quantitative multiplexed patterning of immune-related biomarkers, molecular biomarkers from a diagnostic perspective, new markers of kidney injury, predicting and assessing an inflammatory disease and its complications as exemplified by rheumatoid arthritis, integrating molecular testing into clinical applications, opportunities and risks of biomarker patent strategies, and redefining disease and pharmaceutical targets through molecular definitions and personalized medicine. [As taken from book cover]

New Title for Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Title: Chemical engineering design : principles, practice and economics of plant and process design
Author: Towler, Gavin P.
Call number: TP155.T742
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Synopsis:
Chemical Engineering Design is a complete course text for students of chemical engineering. Written for the Senior Design Course, and also suitable for introduction to chemical engineering courses, it covers the basics of unit operations and the latest aspects of process design, equipment selection, plant and operating economics, safety and loss prevention. It is a textbook that students will want to keep through their undergraduate education and on into their professional lives. [As taken from book cover]

New Title on Nanotechnology

Title: Strategic plan for NIOSH nanotechnology research and guidance
Author: Lang, Martin W.
Call number: T174.7.S898
Availability: Click here

Synopsis:
Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on a near-atomic scale to produce new structures, materials, and devices. This technology has the ability to transform many industries and will have numerous applications to areas ranging from medicine to manufacturing. Research in nanoscale technologies is growing rapidly world-wide. By 2015, the National Science Foundation estimates that nanotechnology will have a $1 trillion impact on the global economy and employ 2 million workers, 1 million of which may be in the United States. Nanomaterials may present new challenges to understanding, predicting, and managing potential health risks to workers. [As taken from book cover]

New Title on Nanotechnology

Title: Applied nanotechnology : the conversion of research results to products
Author: Ramsden, Jeremy
Call number: T174.7.R182
Availability: Click here

Synopsis:
An overview of nanotechnology that encompasses scientific, technological, economic and social issues – investigating the potential of nanotechnology to transform whole sectors of industry from healthcare to energy. Jeremy Ramsden provides a blueprint for those involved in the commercialization of nanotechnology. [As taken from book cover]

New Title on Nanotechnology

Title: Nanosciences : the invisible revolution
Author: Joachim, C.
Call number: T174.7.J62
Availability: Click here

Synopsis:
The nanosciences and their companion nanotechnologies are a hot topic all around the world. For some, they promise developments ranging from nanobots to revolutionary new materials. For others, they raise the specter of Big Brother and of atomically modified organisms (AMOs). This book is a counterbalance to spin and paranoia alike, asking us to consider what the nanosciences really are. Nanosciences are not just a branch of materials sciences, a common misrepresentation fostered in the funding wars. Nor should nanotechnology be confused with miniaturization, a convergence of microelectronics, biotechnology and lab-on-chip techniques. These misconceptions arise from a well-orchestrated US policy dating from the mid-1990s, in which the instrument that lies at the heart of the true nanoscience revolution the scanning tunneling microscope (STM) plays just a minor part. These issues are covered here for the first time in a book by a scientist who holds two Feynman prizes in nanotechnology and who has played a significant role in the birth of the nanosciences. Writing from the cutting edge and with an understanding of the real nature of nanoscience, the author provides a scientific and historical perspective on the subject, a response to the misplaced ethical concerns of objectors and to the scaremongering of the popular press. [As taken from book cover]