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Shirley Ho
Research Director for the Arts, Humanities, Education, & Social Sciences
President’s Office

Dr. Shirley Ho is Associate Professor in the Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information at Nanyang Technological University. She is Research Director for Arts, Humanities, Education, and Social Sciences in the President’s Office at NTU. Her research area focuses on cross-cultural public opinion dynamics related to science and technology, with potential health or environmental impacts. Her work emphasizes the roles of values, social media and other emerging modes of communication in shaping public attitudes toward science and technology. She is recipient of the 2018 AEJMC Hillier Krieghbaum Under-40 Award for her outstanding achievement in research, teaching and service.

Research Statement

Her primary research area focuses on cross-cultural public opinion dynamics related to science and technology, with potential health or environmental impacts. She is the principal investigator of the large-scale, interdisciplinary project, “PiONEERS: Public Opinion of Nuclear Energy and other EneRgy Sources,” funded by the National Research Foundation in Singapore, that seeks to examine how the general public in Southeast Asia form perceptions toward nuclear energy and renewable energies, so as to inform nuclear policy and research.

Research One-liner

My research looks at the roles of values, social media and other emerging modes of communication in shaping public attitudes toward science and technology

Publications

Ho, S. S., Goh, T. J., Chuah, A. S. F., Leung, Y. W., Belaku, M. A., & Viswanath, K. (in press, 2020). Past debates, fresh impact on nano-enabled food: A multi-group comparison of presumed media influence model based on spillover effects of attitude toward genetically-modified food. Journal of Communication.

Ho, S. S., Looi, J., Leung, Y.W., & Goh, T. J. (in press, 2019). Public engagement by STEM and non-STEM researchers in Singapore: A qualitative comparison of macro- and meso-level concerns. Public Understanding of Science.

Ho, S.S., Leong, A.D., Looi, J., Chen, L., Pang, N., & Tandoc, E. Jr. (2019). Science literacy or value predisposition? A meta-analysis of factors predicting public perceptions of benefits, risks, and acceptance of nuclear energy. Environmental Communication13(4), 457-471.

Latest Projects
  • National Research Foundation Grant / 2020-2022: “PiONEERS: Public Opinion of Nuclear Energy and other EneRgy Sources”
  • Ministry of Education Tier 1 Grant/ 2018-2021: “Science Communication on Social Media: Investigating the Roles of Spokesperson Credibility, Issue Controversy, and Discourse Civility on Public Perceptions of Science & Technology”
  • Ministry of Education Tier 1 Grant /2016-2019: “Scientists as Public Intellectuals: Public Communication of Science and Technology (PCST)”
  • National Research Foundation (NPRP) Grant/ 2016-2019: “PONdER: Public Opinion of Nuclear Energy”
Advice to young researchers

Always answer research questions that can make positive impacts to the world.

Other affiliation(s)

Associate Professor, Wee Kim Wee School of Communication and Information, College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences

Expert Areas
and risks, Communicating science, Environment, health

Research Interests
and risks, Communicating science, Environment, health

Research Category
Arts & Humanities, Engineering & Technology, Natural Sciences
Research Sub-category
Communication Studies, Energy, Info-Communication Technology, Nanotechnology & Nano-Science
NISTH Assigned Topic Groupings
Fighting inequality, Tele-health, medicine, rehab & therapeutics
Affiliated Sustainable Development Goals
GOAL 3: GOOD HEALTH AND WELL-BEING – Ensuring healthy lives and promoting the well-being for all at all ages is essential to sustainable development.
GOAL 7: AFFORDABLE AND CLEAN ENERGY – Energy is central to nearly every major challenge and opportunity.
GOAL 13: CLIMATE ACTION – Climate change is a global challenge that affects everyone, everywhere.
The Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), also known as the Global Goals, were adopted by all United Nations Member States in 2015 as a universal call to action to end poverty, protect the planet and ensure that all people enjoy peace and prosperity by 2030.
Last Updated
14 Apr 2020
Last Updated
13 Sep 2020