Research

Stress, Health and Heart Study

Coronary heart disease (CHD), including blockage of heart artery and heart attack, are among the leading causes of mortality and disabilities not only in Singapore but also around the globe. It has been recognized that psychosocial stress is significantly associated with the onset of CHD, as well as poor recovery after an acute event. However, there is little empirical research investigating the pathways by which stress may lead to poor health outcomes of CHD patients. This study will address several critical issues in past research and extend the current literature. It proposes to investigate how CHD patients’ stress and related characteristics (e.g., emotional distress, personality and coping), as well as their partners’, may influence patients’ self-care health behavior and physical health functioning in the context of interpersonal relationship.

Specifically, this study aims to:
(1) Assess and evaluate the psychosocial and health profiles of CHD patients, including stress, anxiety, depression, social support, joint coping style, self-efficacy, and personality, in order to identify the important characteristics that may influence CHD patients’ recovery and rehabilitation over 12 months;
(2) In addition to the patients’ characteristics, we will also assess these psychosocial factors of the patients’ most significant other, that is, the spouse or partner (if no spouse) or the loved one who is involved in his/her healthcare.

We will examine how the spouse/partner’s stress and psychosocial characteristics related to stress and coping may affect the patients’ self-care behavior, health recovery, and rehabilitation outcomes over 12 months.

The findings will have valuable and significant research and practical implications for developing effective and timely behavioral interventions for the individuals and their families living and coping with CHD.

Eligible Participants
(1)  Individuals (above 21 years old) diagnosed with heart disease;
(2)  Individuals without another serious medical disease that requires ongoing intensive treatment;
(3)  Individuals without cognitive or mental conditions that may limit your ability to respond to survey questions

Diabetes Study

Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is an emerging global epidemic that incurs tremendous economic, health, and personal burdens. In Singapore, approximately 1 in 10 persons live with diabetes while the prevalence rates continue to rise rapidly. It is projected that by 2030 the number of Singaporeans above 40 with diabetes would increase by another 200,000, imposing serious threats to the healthcare system and personal welfare. To successfully manage T2DM, the daily self-care and medical adherence is of paramount importance. However, considering the complexity and demanding nature, diabetes self-care and adherence are also challenging and stress-inducing, not only for patients but for their families as well.

In this preliminary study, we attempt to understand the stress and emotional distress associated with diabetes management, for both the patients and their significant others (e.g., spouses, partners, significant family members) as well. In addition, this study also seeks to identify the crucial psychosocial factors that may affect diabetic patients’ self-care behavior and health outcomes over time.

Specifically, this study aims to:
(1) Assess and evaluate the psychosocial and health profiles of T2DM patients, including stress, anxiety, depression, social support, joint coping style, self-efficacy, and personality, in order to identify the important characteristics that may influence T2DM patients’ health functioning over 12 months;
(2) In addition to the patients, we will also assess these psychosocial factors of the patients’ most significant other, that is, the spouse or partner (if no spouse) or the loved one who is involved in his/her healthcare.

We will examine how the spouse/partner’s stress and psychosocial characteristics may affect the patients’ self-care behavior, and health functioning over 12 months.

The findings will have valuable and significant research and practical implications for developing effective and timely behavioral interventions for the individuals and their families living and coping with T2DM.

Eligible Participants
(1) at least 21 years old;
(2) the patient is diagnosed with T2DM;
(3) the patient’s health is not in acute deterioration.

For the spouses/partners/significant others of the patients:
(1) at least 21 years old;
(2) being a spouse or partner (if no spouse) or an important family member or friend (if no spouse or partner) of a T2DM patient who agrees to participate in the study;
(3) not having major life-threatening illness and receiving treatment (e.g., diabetes, cancer, kidney failure);
(4) not having severely impaired cognitive deficits that prevent them from understanding and responding to questionnaires and interviews

To Participate

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