Publications

Exploring the Crossroads of Linguistic Diversity: Language Contact in Southeast Asia

Edited by Halina Gottlieb, Astrid Kensinger, Galina Mihaleva, Marijke Van Kets and Hedren Sum
ISBN: 978-91-85960-06-4
Published under KnowHow Books – a series of publications to facilitate knowledge transfer from Research to Practice, from academics and creative professionals to museum practitioners

This 181-page book represents the voice of an interdisciplinary group of researchers about the process through which they conduct research. The aim of this book is to make research accessible to the general public by presenting methods, results, and researchers themselves in a new light. Research is exciting and applicable to daily life, and should not be perceived as an overly sophisticated activity performed by stuffy academics using impenetrable jargon. Our intention is to translate the research process to show that it is understandable and relatable, and to introduce researchers as we know them in real life – passionate, enthusiastic and constantly curious about the world. This book acts as a bridge between the research process and everyday practice for people working in the digital humanities sector, creative industry and beyond, and would be useful for any researcher who uses a multidisciplinary approach in their work. The ultimate goal of this book is to be a source of inspiration to those who would like to take the next step in their research careers, and those who are simply curious about how society can benefit from research.

Preferred Citation

Gottlieb, H., Kensinger, A., Mihaleva, G., Van Kets, M., & Sum, W. Y. (2016). Exploring the Crossroads of Linguistic Diversity: Language Contact in Southeast Asia. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University].

Stories and Songs from Kagate

Compiled by Lauren Gawne; edited by Ningmar Tamang,; and illustrated by Ng Xiao Yan

Preferred Citation

Gawne, L., Tamang, N. & Ng, Y. Y. (2017). Stories and Songs from Kagate. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University].

Sopfünuo

Illustrated by Ng Yan Ying; translated by Kelhumetuo Liezietsu; supervised by Joan Marie Kelly in collaboration with Kenei Kuotsu

Preferred Citation

Ng, Y. Y., Liezietsu, K., Kelly, J. & Kuotsu, K. (2017). Sopfünuo. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University].

Jackal & Pheasant

Original story by Muna Luna; translated by Sabina Lama Compiled by Lauren Gawne; illustrated by Jolene Tan; artistic encouragement by Joan Marie Kelly; and layout by Emily Gref

Preferred Citation

Luna, M., Lama, S., Gawne, L., Tan, J., Kelly, J. & Gref, E. (2017). Jackal and Phesant. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University]

Henselila Ne Cepah Chapane Ahen Car? Why Does The Leopard Cat Eat Chickens?

Narrated in 2004 by Kikumsungba Imchen of Mangmetong Village, Nagaland, India; translated by Assoc Prof Alexander R. Coupe and Asst Prof T. Temsunungsang (English and Foreign Languages University, Shillong India); illustrated by Yang Yu; and produced by Joan Marie Kelly

Why Does The Leopard Cat Eat Chickens? is a short story featuring a sly leopard cat and a vain chicken, where the leopard cat was initially curious and afraid of the chicken, but later managed to gain confidence and prey on the chicken instead. The moral of this story conveys to the readers of the consequences of being vain, where vanity could in fact blind them from making proper judgment and could lead them to ultimate destruction. It also teaches its people to beware of their surrounding tribes where danger is always lurking (in the form of the leopard cat).  In addition, it also hints that one has to be stronger/ more ferocious than the others in order to protect oneself.

Preferred Citation

Imchen, K., Coupe, A., Temsunungsang, T., Yu, Y. & Kelly, J. (2017). Henselila Ne Cepah Chapane Ahen Car? Why Does The Leopard Cat Eat Chickens?. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University].

Mon Mot Mon – Giant Snake Mon Mot

A legend by Anderlas Padafani, illustrated by Ng Xiao Yan; translated by František Kratochvíl & Benediktus Delpada; Edited by Joan Kelly

“The legend of Mon Mot tells the tale of a clan that survived a disaster. One day Mon Mot the Giant Snake attacked a village. Only one pregnant woman escaped and hid in a cave. She raised her twin sons, who grew up and prepared a trap to kill the Snake. After Mon Mot died, their dead relatives miraculously returned.”

As recounted by Anderlas Padafani from the Abui tribe, the folktale is retold in a form of a children storybook with two languages: Abui and English.

Preferred Citation

Padafani, A., František Kratochvíl, F., Delpada, B., & Kelly, J. (2016). Mon Mot Mon – Giant Snake Mon Mot. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University].

Chakewa Guou: Boiled Crab

Folktale adapted from Hutton J.H. The Angami Nagas, London: Macmillan and CO; translated by Kenei Kuotsu; illustrated by Peh Yang Yu; and produced by Joan Marie Kelly and Kenei Kuotsu

Boiled Crab, Seguo Cha Kewa Dze is a story about a crab that tries to imitate a bird he saw laying eggs into a pot of boiling water to make a lunch for a group of animal friends. Although when the crab tries to lay the eggs into the boiling water he slips and falls in, killing himself. The group of animal friends find him later that day and eat him.

Preferred Citation

Kuotsu, K., Peh, Y. Y. & Kelly, J. (2016). Mon Mot Mon – Giant Snake Mon Mot. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University].

Akhula Khe Inisala Net Hyutse: The Story of Tiger And The Rabbit

Story narrated in 1999 by Rongsenlemba Jamir of Mangmetong Village, Mokokchung District, Nagaland, India; translated by Assoc Prof Alexander R. Coupe and Asst Prof T. Temsunungsang (English and Foreign Languages University, Shillong India); illustrated by Lesley Tang; and produced by Joan Marie Kelly

The Tiger And The Rabbit features two titular animal characters whose interactions and eventual fates illustrate the idea that a mild individual can overcome a great king through the use of wit and intellect. The story itself is transcribed from the spoken Mongsen Ao dialect into written form, and translated into English. Both versions of the text are featured in the storybook with the transcribed Mongsen Ao taking precedence, as it is the language that is endangered.

Preferred Citation

Jamir, R., Coupe, A., Temsunungsang, T., Tang, L. & Kelly, J. (2014). Akhula Khe Inisala Net Hyutse: The Story of Tiger And The Rabbit. Singapore: [Nanyang Technological University].

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