Bio X Culture

May 1, 2017

Project Summary

The aim of this project is to challenge the idea of using the traditional textile motifs or ornamental pieces used in traditional dance found in Southeast Asia region especially in Thailand to create wearable device that has a cultural meaning. The interactivity is based on the Behavioral Artefacts caress meaning, definition, what is caress: to touch or kiss someone in a gentle and loving way. The questions are: to define how we tap into the many modalities of the body through clothing as the interface to help us navigate the world, communicate, entertain or generally bring us greater understanding of ourselves? What kind of information processing do we want to carry out on our bodies? What kind of functionality do we want to enable inside our clothes or jewellery? The design concept enables the product to focus on aesthetic considerations, which are paramount in decisions about what people would wear. Are they ready to be transformed into bioscapes or biological memory membranes, wearing the inner state out? Clothing is also one of our most intimate and personal technologies; it functions as protection, disguise, and interface to the world. We developed wearable composition based on the form and function The material selected for the project is lycra mesh. The stretch and recovery properties of the knit textile allows the fit of the garment to be very tight and to plays the role of a second skin and barrier between the environment and the body. This particular quality of the textiles is valuable for the successful body contour and smooth technology placement.

Presentation

The aim of this paper is to find meaningful connection and relationship between tradition and innovation and to demonstrate their functional implementation in the wearable technology applications. While developing the new field of smart textiles, this paper stresses the importance of learning from traditional crafts and the value of craftsmanship. Exploration and use of the traditional textile motifs or ornamental pieces popular in traditional dance found in Southeast Asia region in Thailand are the input for a discussion about the role of craftsmanship and skills in developing materials with interactive properties that is held with relation to the possibilities for societal sustainability. Translation of traditional textile structures to digital code using biological data to make 3D printed textiles is discussed in this paper. The relationship of the behavior of that printed textile unit and what kind of functionality we want to enable inside our clothes is also examined.

Created By

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Galina Mihaleva

School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University

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Pat Pataranutaporn

School of Arts, Media and Engineering, Arizona State University

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Audrey Ng

School of Art, Design and Media, Nanyang Technological University

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